6 Call Center Lessons For Your Small Business – Part 2

6 Call Center Lessons For Your Small Business – Part 2

The call center environment is often a breeding ground for professional development.  The fast-paced atmosphere fosters and hones Sales, Customer Service, Time Management, and Marketing skills, just to name a few. I truly believe that most small businesses can benefit from implementing some of the same mindset that call center professionals live by.

In Part 1 of this series, we covered Lessons 1 – 3: Finish the script, Assume the Sale, and Know Your Product and/or Service.

We continue now with the second half of 6 Call Center Lessons for Your Small Business.

4.  Personality goes a long a way.  I’ve seen it more times than I can count: two different agents reading exactly the same script can sound completely different, and their performance can be miles apart.  All the way up to the CEO, personality and people-skills make all the difference, and can only contribute positively to your success.

How this applies to Your Business:

• Remain pleasant and be genuine.  It seems like a given to be pleasant and approachable in business, especially to your customers and clients. But it doesn’t hurt to keep it at the forefront of your thoughts, especially when you’re really busy or stressed.

• Have a personal brand. Sell your story. Your product or service is an extension of you and your passion.  Who are you?  Let your personality shine through.

• Stay connected – To your colleagues, employees, and customers.  Don’t get so caught up in administration and minutiae that you become detached from the soul of your business.

5.  Tweak and repeat.  Any call center professional will tell you that perfect practice makes perfect practice.  Yes, you read that right.  There is constant adaptation, even if it’s a tiny word in a script, or a slight change in voice emphasis, or a small alteration in call volume management.  We keep tweaking until it comes together perfectly.  Then we tweak again.

How this applies to Your Business:

Make analysis important in your business.  This isn’t always as difficult or complex as it sounds.  It’s more about paying attention to what’s happening and the willingness to change accordingly.  This sometimes means making proactive, forecasted changes, versus always being on the reacting end.

• Capture data.  There a million tools out there designed for businesses to capture literally any kind of data.  Even if all you can afford is a simple spreadsheet, find some way to mine all that valuable information that makes up your world, and use it to your advantage!

• Be open to making adjustments.  Don’t be so married to an idea that you find it impossible to make changes that may take that idea to the next level.

6. Have Fun!  The best call center environments put effort into striking a great balance between work and play.  Why?  Because customers can tell when you’re miserable.  Basically anyone can tell when you’re miserable.  The job can be stressful, so call centers try to inject as much fun as possible to keep spirits high.

How this applies to Your Business:

• SMILE!  I mean it.  Right now, just smile.  As entrepreneurs, our days can be ultra-challenging.  No matter what’s going on, you can find something to smile about.

• Don’t take yourself too seriously.  Presentation went awry?  Customer yelled at you?  Quarterly sales in a slump?  It feels horrible, I know.  I literally fell on my rump in front of a star client once.  Sometime you just have to laugh it off, and keep moving.  Tomorrow is another day.

• Inject a little fun into your day, even in a small way.  You LOVE your business, remember?  Don’t forget it.

Remember, your business becomes uniquely yours with practice, patience, passion, and persistence.  Use all your great experience and talent and funnel it right into your business!

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